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Archive for the ‘Pearson’ Category

PearsonTwo former homes of Lester Pearson have a probable date with the wrecking ball. One is at 1984 Yonge Street in Toronto. It was the Davisville Methodist Church manse where he lived for three years shortly after he was born. The other is at 231 Cobourg Avenue in Ottawa, an apartment building that has served more recently as Uganda’s high commission office. Pearson lived there in the mid-1950s while serving as Canada’s External Affairs minister.

While there aren’t efforts to save the heavily renovated Toronto house — the local historical society feels a plaque on the site is sufficient — there is a more concerted effort to save the aging red brick apartment block in Ottawa.

When is it appropriate to turn former homes of past leaders into historical sites? Most Prime Ministers have lived in many places during their lifetimes. Sparing all the buildings or turning them into historical sites simply isn’t practical. The key is determining which homes have played a significant part in the life of the former Prime Minister — places like Macdonald‘s Bellevue or Laurier‘s & Mackenzie King‘s Laurier House — and not be too concerned about sites that just happened to be home addresses for relatively short periods of time.

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trudeauPierre Trudeau always had a way of grabbing headlines. As the Unconventional Prime Minister, he attracted attention from the start of his political career, capturing his first Newsmaker of the Year nod in 1968, the year he became PM. He went on to win the designation 10 more times, being chosen an impressive eight years in row from 1968 to 1975, then again three years later. In 1999, he was picked again — as well as crowned Canadian Newsmaker of the Century. Trudeau received the title one last time in 2000, the year he died.

The PM with the second most Newsmaker titles is Lester Pearson, clocking in with nine wins. Interestingly, he received six of those while serving as a foreign affairs diplomat or minister, and just three as leader. Other PMs to be CP’s Newsmaker of the Year have been John Diefenbaker (5 times), Brian Mulroney (3), Jean Chrétien (2), Paul Martin (2), Stephen Harper (2), William Lyon Mackenzie King (1), Louis St. Laurent (1), Joe Clark (1), Kim Campbell (1) and Justin Trudeau (1).

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TurnerNo, they haven’t. But two came very close. Lester Pearson enjoyed a prolific and competitive hockey career, particularly during his years studying at Oxford, playing for Switzerland in the European championships in 1922. The following year, he was approached to play for England’s hockey team in the 1924 Winter Olympic Games in Chamonix, France. He turned it down, having just accepted a job as a lecturer at the University of Toronto.

John Turner won the national 100-yard and 200-yard dashes in 1947, ultimately running the 100 in 9.7 seconds. Then, in February 1948, he injured his knee in a car accident. He trained hard to run in Canada’s Olympic trials that spring, but collapsed on the track, ending his chance to compete in the Summer Olympic Games in London.

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may211964: The cabinet of Lester Pearson approves his favoured design for a Canadian national flag. It’s three red maple leaves flanked by blue vertical bars. But his proposed flag is about to get a very rough ride.

The opposition leader, John Diefenbaker, is adamantly against it, as are many members of the Canadian Legion. By the fall, the flag design will have morphed into one red leaf between two red bars. A marathon flag debate in the House of Commons in December will result in the revised flag’s adoption.

PearsonPennant

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CampbellSix Prime Ministers did not use their first given names. They were Henry (Wilfrid) Laurier, Joseph (Pierre) Trudeau, Charles (Joe) Clark, Martin (Brian) Mulroney, Avril (Kim) Clark and Joseph (Jean) Chrétien.

William King preferred his third name Mackenzie, while Lester Pearson was more comfortable with the nickname Mike.

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ChretienIn 1888, Sir John A. Macdonald appointed 33-year-old Charles Hibbert Tupper to be his Minister of Marine & Fisheries. Tupper, the son of Sir Charles Tupper, became the country’s youngest cabinet member, a record that remained his throughout Canada’s first century.

In 1967, another 33-year-old (although a few months older), joined cabinet. Lester Pearson appointed Jean Chrétien to be a Minister Without Portfolio.

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As of today, only eight Prime Ministers have served longer than Stephen Harper as the country’s leader. He passed John Diefenbaker‘s record of 5 years, 10 months, 1 day in the role. Earlier this year he passed Lester Pearson, Alexander Mackenzie and then R.B. Bennett to reach the top 10 on the longevity list.

But the streak is over for the next few years. He won’t pass Louis St. Laurent‘s term of 8 years, 7 months, 6 days until 2014. Should he be looking to overtake William Lyon Mackenzie King, with his more than 21 years in power, it won’t happen until 2027. Of course, King did that in three separate terms of office. Harper could best Sir Wilfrid Laurier‘s record for the longest continuous term (15 years, 2 months, 25 days) in 2021.

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