Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Joe Clark’

MacdonaldThe majority of Canadian Prime Ministers have had schools named after them, but as some Canadians revise their assessment of our leaders through the prism of today’s mores, expect the clamour to expunge the names to continue. That’s because all of our leaders have a dark side. They did things in their day that they believed (and were seen by most of society at the time) to be the ‘right thing’.

Macdonald has lots of schools named after him; Laurier has a university; Abbott has a college. A few have had schools named after them that have since closed (Bowell and Bennett). Clark is the only living former PM with a school bearing his name, although Mulroney has a university institute named after him in the Maritimes.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

CampbellSix Prime Ministers did not use their first given names. They were Henry (Wilfrid) Laurier, Joseph (Pierre) Trudeau, Charles (Joe) Clark, Martin (Brian) Mulroney, Avril (Kim) Clark and Joseph (Jean) Chrétien.

William King preferred his third name Mackenzie, while Lester Pearson was more comfortable with the nickname Mike.

Read Full Post »

ClarkYoung Joe Clark, a speechwriter for Conservative leader Robert Stanfield had been dating Catriona Gibson for four years, even though he was in Ottawa and she was studying law in Toronto. One of their rendezvous, in fall 1969, was in Huntsville, Ontario. On the return to Toronto, Gibson was killed in a car accident. It was two days before Clark heard the news.

Read Full Post »

MackenzieNewspaper editors among past PMs were Alexander Mackenzie (Lambton Shield), Mackenzie Bowell (Belleville Intelligencer), Charles Tupper (British Colonist), and Wilfrid Laurier (Le Défricheur).

John A. Macdonald founded the Toronto Mail, William Lyon Mackenzie King edited the government’s Labour Gazette, Pierre Trudeau was heavily involved with Cité libre, Joe Clark wrote for the Albertan and various other publications, and John Turner edited his high school and university papers.

Read Full Post »

feb051964: Having lost last year’s election to the Liberals, former prime minister John Diefenbaker wins a leadership review vote in Ottawa.

The president of the Progressive Conservative Student Federation, Joe Clark, introduces the Chief at the annual meeting.

Read Full Post »

There have been eight.

Since the creation of the Order of Canada on July 1, 1967, only two former Prime Ministers have not received it. John Diefenbaker was still an MP at the time of his death in 1979; sitting politicians are ineligible for the honour. Paul Martin stepped down as an MP in 2008; presumably he’ll receive the recognition in the next few years. His father was made a Companion of the Order in 1976.

For the record, PM Companions have been Louis St. Laurent, Lester Pearson, Pierre Trudeau, Joe Clark, John Turner, Brian Mulroney, Kim Campbell and Jean Chretien.

Interesting side note: Elizabeth May, leader of the Green Party and a sitting politician, belongs to the Order. She received the honour before entering politics.

Read Full Post »

Realistically, there were eight. Four of them were francophones: Sir Wilfrid Laurier, Louis St. Laurent, Pierre Trudeau and Jean Chretien. Four were English: Joe Clark, Brian Mulroney, Paul Martin and Stephen Harper.

The PM with the broadest facility for languages was English-speaking Sir Robert Borden who had a working knowledge of French, German, Greek and Latin.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »